Posts tagged “Personal training

Change the plan, not the players.

Do you believe that you currently posses everything you need to succeed?

I love reminding myself that I am exactly where I need to be with the true story “Acre of Diamonds.”  This story is about a farmer who lived in Africa and through a visitor became extremely intrigued in seeking out diamonds in Africa to make the big bucks.  He chose to sell his house and travel the land.  The farmer continued traveling, becoming discouraged as he was not coming across any diamonds.  Tragically, the farmer’s funds ran out and he threw himself into a river and drowned.

Meanwhile, the new homeowner of his property discovered an odd looking rock about the size of an egg and displayed it on his mantle.  A visitor stopping by was stunned and wide-eyed as he gazed at the odd rock, a world phenomenon, the largest diamond ever found!!!  Hmmm….the property was full of them.

This farm became known as the Kimberly Diamond Mine, the RICHEST the world has ever known.  The previous farmer was literally standing on his very own “acre of diamonds” until he sold his land to seek elsewhere.

What an amazing story.  What treasures am I not looking at in the right light?  The moral of this story has been present for me this week as I firmly believe that I am exactly where I need to be and have unique, personalized tools for success.  Over my volleyball career, numerous game changing moments occurred when we were out of subs and without being able to change any players we could change the game plan.  Changing the plan, not the players is precisely what I need to do in my life as well.  After all, diamonds certainly have an odd look in their raw form.

Game changing plan:

1.  SHIFT IN PERSPECTIVE:  I live in LAS VEGAS, how cool!!!!  Born and raised in Colorado, it is so easy for me to talk about all that Denver has to offer, the community, the beautiful nature, etc.  While Denver still holds a beloved place in my heart, each day I choose to celebrate this new journey with my most loving husband here in Vegas, connecting with genuine people, enjoying the desert playground and exposing myself in new ways…people don’t know what I’ve done or what I’m capable of until I show them!

2.  CHOOSE TO SUPPORT MY BODY:  Having health and energy is the foundation in accomplishing any goal.  I am so blessed to be in my body and have the knowledge of knowing what foods best support me in feeling energized.  My body is my player, on my team…forever…I want to plan to feel my best all the time!  The more in touch I become with my body, the better I can plan ahead, from my workout level each day to food choices I make.  Example: cereal does nothing good for me.  It leaves me lethargic and craving more sweets.  Plan ahead, have an alternative snack prepared for when that craving hits or get the cereal out of the cupboard completely.

3.  I KNOW ENOUGH:  Get over the fear of not knowing enough…IF someone else can do it, why can’t I?  I don’t know what I don’t know until I seek, learn and discover that the odd rock actually is a diamond waiting to be discovered!  Change the plan: set goals, write them in the affirmative each day, and share only with those I know will support me!

Will a refreshingly new level of diamond be exposed if you set your alarm just 5 minutes earlier each week to create more time in the mornings for a workout, journal time, or a sit down breakfast with family?

Experience discomfort, try new things and look at that odd rock with a new perspective. You ARE exactly where you need to be, equipped with the most uniquely fitted passions and tools to unravel something great.  BELIEVE THAT : )

You can listen to the full story here:

Be empowered,

Lizzie :)


I am fearless.

I was 14 years old, within my first months of ever picking up a volleyball and my coach asked me to think of a word that would define how I wanted to play.  Through my mind ran words that I had seen on the shoes of the 18 year old girls.  For example, looking down at the shoes of a player of whom I really looked up to with amazement, had the word “unstoppable” written across the toe box of her shoes.  It seemed as though rich possibilities outgrew my mind and I toyed with a few words and soon enough, one stuck.

fear-less

adjective

without fear; bold or brave; intrepid.

To me, this word triggered an invincible feeling.  It enabled me to play within my skill level while aggressively attacking the blockers on the other side of the net…even if they were 5 inches taller than me.  The word fearless surfaced confidence in me as I told my setter, “give me this ball, I’ll put it away.”  I taped my wrist before each game and wrote the word fearless on it, always reminding me of what kind of player I wanted to be.

Fearless, believe, great, beautiful, curious, cheerful, courageous, ALIVE!, excited.

How do you feel after reading these words?  I love how words can trigger different emotions and actions from people.  What word or phrase empowers you to be great everyday?  What words support your goals and promote you to live large?  What do you believe of yourself, your body, your capabilities when working out?  Do you set goals with your trainer or talk about your “power” words to drive success?  The saying is true, we are what we think about!  Building on that idea, get a bit more depth from a very effective goal coach, Brian Tracy.

Today, I have a piece of art that I can always see, featuring the word fearless, as it continues to trigger emotions and actions for me!

Be empowered,

Lizzie :)


You be the judge?

The one thing I have noticed throughout my career as a personal trainer, fitness professional, and educator/presenter, is how the public, and even worse my peers pass judgment so arrogantly quick and with reckless ignorance. This is something that I am genuinely concerned about, because it effects my profession, and it’s growth or lack thereof. I will also ask you the reader to see if you can find similarities in our society, but more importantly, do you see it in yourself?

Training at health club again has exposed my peers and members to my training style using science, systems, and tools that I have learned and accumulated through the years. For me it has been a process and evolution through countless hours of self discovery mixed with continuing education, seminars, workshops, etc. Never settling for what I know as good enough, I’ve been able to see, do, teach, and learn things that I wish everyone knew. The flip side of this is that this has lead to members and peers judging and ridiculing what I do and with what I do it with. It’s as if they feel that my  choice of movement and tools is a personal attack on them and their loved ones. Never, have they considered coming up to me and asking, hey Arthur, I saw you doing this with that, why? I would’ve loved to talk about my passion and I would’ve been appreciative of their curiosity. Another part of me is also thinking, how can my peers not breakdown what I’m doing and see the science and benefits behind it. And if they did, they could educate their clients, and an agent of change is born.

I’ll admit I’m guilty of this as well, albeit a long time ago. It took someone to judge me the first time I did something different.  I can remember the first time I started movement preps in 2004, the first time I wore Vibrams into the gym, the first time I did an out of the box exercise. The way it made me feel was awful. It spawned me to think differently. With some words of wisdom I’ve been able to rise above, here’s some examples;

“Logic will get you from A to B, imagination will take you everywhere”

Never limit yourself because of others limited imagination. Never limit others because of your limited imagination”

“Great minds will always be violently opposed by mediocre thinkers”

“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.”

It is because of my personal experiences and quotes like these, that allow me to take a different approach from what I initially wanted to do, which would make me come off as unprofessional, as well as make them more steadfast in their philosophy, and more resistant to change.

I believe that their mindset and quickness to judge is a combination of fear with lack of education. Because if “knowledge is power” than lack of knowledge is weakness that causes fear in those in the presence of power (knowledge). Side note: that is complete bullshit in my eyes. Knowledge should lead to humility in the sense that it shows how much; a) you don’t know and b) how much there really is left to learn. Failure to grasp this is an excuse. Therefore failures make excuses as to why they can’t, and can’t never accomplished anything.

I always sincerely thank those who take the time out of their lives to educate me. I let them know that their efforts are not wasted as it provokes my curiosity to learn more. The best part is that my profession allows me the platform to share what I have had the privilege to learn to both my peers and my clients.

The moral of this post is don’t judge, instead try to understand. There’s less prejudice and more education involved. If you can’t figure it out then ask, the worst that can happen is you learned something, good or indifferent.  Can you imagine a world that’s not quick to judge, but eager to learn? It all starts with you!

AH


A change of scenery

I am going to break away from my usual educational blog, and write about what’s been going on the past two months. Since March 6th. 2012 I have been working at Lifetime Athletics in Summerlin. I am still a part of ATP with Hayley, the only difference is, I train clients in a new location and I no longer teach the weekend boot camp classes. It’s been a lot of fun training out of LTA (Lifetime Athletics), as I work with a great bunch in the Personal training Dept. The freedom to train according to my philosophies, and using systems, sciences, and tools that I feel benefit my clients and I the most has been a major part of my professional happiness that hasn’t been there for quite some time ;)

Lifetime is very supportive and well ahead of the curve in terms of allowing their trainers to explore the many, many systems, sciences, and tools that are out there in the fitness industry. I feel that I can still grow and learn in this environment and that in of itself is why I enjoy working there. Since my time at LVAC, I have learned a great deal, and to be able to showcase what I have been privileged to learn with new members, clients, and most importantly my fellow peers (trainers) has been very exciting. I get to see what other trainers are into, what their philosophies, and training styles are like. I get to see what members and clients like to do, what drives them, what their perception of our industry as a whole is, and most importantly where they think fitness is and should be going.

If you are a personal trainer, I feel you have to love what you do, and love where you do it. Your environment should make you want to wake up a go do your thing, whatever and wherever that may be. It should motivate you to improve yourself everyday and people should feel your passion, and positive vibe near and from afar. Most importantly, you should be happy. Because if you not in a good place, then you can’t help anyone get there either.

AH


Inspired…. and more!

This week one of my clients told me something that brought tears to my eyes and made me feel the most accomplished I have ever felt in my short lived career.

It was something so simple, but made me realize my deepest desire in what I do for living had been met.

You see last year, I hit several remarkable milestones in my career…
- I became a published author for one of the most renowned online fitness resources, PtontheNet; not just once, but two times over.
- I presented at IDEA World fitness conference alongside some of the industry’s best on an international stage.
- I was promoted to Master Trainer for TRX and became responsible for developing future instructors in the industry.
- I had the honor of teaching 4 mentorships to a private career college to new trainers coming into the industry.

I recall feeling proud in each of those moments and recognizing their significance in my journey, but still they didn’t surmount to the moment that happened this week.

My client, who was home for spring break from college, told me she had a project in her class where she had to give a speech on someone who inspired her.  She said that it was one of the easiest speeches she ever had to give, and wanted to thank me for everything I had taught her.  She felt confident that she could be healthy and live her life in the best way possible because of how I had trained her.  She concluded by saying: “You inspire me.”

I was overwhelmed by the feelings that came after she told me.

I got into training, because someone INSPIRED me too!  Someone taught me what exercise and living a healthy lifestyle could do.  I got into training because I wanted to inspire others. It really all boils down to that. So when she said I inspired her, I FELT COMPLETE.

Inspiration by dictionary definition is: “A divine influence.”

I believe that to be inspired, we must not only be influenced to do something, but we must feel that in our pursuit those that grace our path in hopes of helping; listen to our needs physically, emotionally, and mentally.  Stimulating us in every aspect of our being, and showing us that we are capable of accomplishing whatever we set our mind, body, and soul to. Inspiration comes when someone believes in us more than we believe in ourselves.  The moment when that belief from someone becomes a reality in proof of what our own actions accomplish is when we are inspired.

Many of you have entrusted me in helping you in your pursuit of health and fitness.  I do not take it lightly that you have given me that responsibility. I only hope that in your journey towards reaching your goals you can be inspired too.

Inspiration requires two things… An obstacle to overcome, and a belief that we can overcome it.

So my challenge to any trainer in the industry is to supply a belief in your clients. And my challenge to any client seeking health and fitness goals is to find someone who believes in your ability to reach those goals. But most importantly, trainers should ask this KEY question when interviewing clients: “In what ways to you believe I can help you?”

“When we find the why, we find the way.” (Paul Taylor) And when we are on the way, it is the ‘belief’ that we can that allows us to figure out the HOW.

Move More,
Hayley Hollander
(For more info on building inspiration from the first encounter with a client visit http://www.ptaglobal.com and look into the Program Design Questionairre)


Lets ‘Spice’ it up

We are swiftly running through the first month of 2012. Everyone is still on target with their goals of being fit and healthy. The question is, how long will this last for most individuals? When does the new years resolution turn into a memory of the past or that ‘goal’ you set but never got accomplished? This happens far too much and it’s time, well, to spice things up!

Everyone wants to not only live an active and healthy lifestyle but they want to be able to eat the right foods in order to compliment their hard work. Thus, being healthy from the inside out.

The lie: “Food that is good for you tastes horrible and I don’t have time to cook.”
The truth: “I am too lazy to cook the food that is good for me.”
Fact: There are simple recipes that take minimal time to create a meal full of all the greatness our bodies need.

Lets help you out. Here are just a few recipes that take less than 30 minutes in the kitchen to create and you can make enough to last a few days. OOHH YEA!

Turkey Breast Patties
Ingredients:

1 package ground turkey breast
½ c. spaghetti sauce
2 egg whites
½ tsp. garlic powder
1 Tbs. parsley flakes
1Tbs. olive oil
Dash of black pepper
1 package fat free croutons crushed

Instructions:

Mix all but croutons together. Form into patties coat with crushed croutons and place in pan coated with PAM. Cover and cook over medium heat until done. About three minutes per side. Serve with a side of spaghetti sauce. Can also top with parmesan cheese. They are also great cold the next day!

CHICKEN CHILI
Ingredients:

2 large cans of chicken breast
1 can fat-free chicken broth
1 can chopped tomatoes with jalepenos or
Green chiles
1 can crisp corn
1 can chili beans
1 can white or other bean
1 tsp. chopped garlic/1 T. olive oil
1 tsp. chili powder/1T. chopped dried onion

Instructions:

Saute the garlic until brown in olive oil. Start adding all cans ( drain the corn and beans first). Add chili powder and onion (can use fresh). Cook over low-medium heat about 25 minutes until it is simmering… IT’S READY!

To add a KICK- add ½ cup of your favorite salsa to the mix!

Enjoy friends! Stay tuned for more next week!

Be healthy and keep moving,

Casey


Tips on Setting Successful Goals

It is that time of the year again. This is the time when everyone feels the NEED and the STRESS or the MOTIVATION to set health and fitness goals for the New Year. Many people don’t know how to set goals that are actually attainable to their personal success. Some may not know where to begin when setting a goal. It is easy to get hung up on the past and not focus on what is best for you in the present. A colleague of mine once told me to, “Devote your energy to create new value in the present and not resentments of the past.” With this being said, lets go over some key values to setting successful goals.

First, lets get down to the specifics. The specifics of your goal are important so that you are not overwhelmed with too many goals. Too many people make generalizations about their goal like, “I want to lose weight” or “I want to be thin.” These are not very specific. Think about how much weight do you want to lose or how about what does being ‘thin’ really mean? Lean muscle? All of these are great points to consider when narrowing your goal down to a specific one.

Next lets talk about the time frame of your goal and the realistic value attached to the goal. Many people set unrealistic goals that in turn, set them up for failure and disappointment. Making smart decisions about your goals and an attainable time frame is very important and key to success. Saying things like “I want to lose 50lbs in 4 wks” is not realistic. A goal like “I want to have a 30 inch waist in 3 months” is more attainable if you are closer to that measurement. Setting yourself up for success from the beginning is key to success in the end.

The last key value to think about is “Is the goal I set attainable?” If you have to think about it, more then likely it isn’t. Making smart choices to make small steps towards the bigger picture will keep you on the pathway to your health and fitness success. Making sure you don’t put yourself on a short time frame to achieve your goal helps as well because then you alleviate the sense of emergency to get your goal accomplished.

Lets start the New Year off with a brand new YOU! Advanced Training Performance has the trainer’s to help you set and reach any goal you have. Lets take your dreams off the shelf and make them a reality. Your success is our success!

Cheers my friends,

Casey Arnold


Menage Trois ;)

Get your head out of the gutter folks! Below was a question my professor asked in my anatomy/physiology course. I thought it was worth sharing.

What are some lifestyle changes a person can make to help to improve overall health?  List at least 3 and describe the benefits of each.

In my opinion, the 3 very important factors for a positive lifestyle change in an individual to improve overall health is, weight loss, coronary artery disease, and stress. What you will probably notice is that the three components actually overlap with one another in some capacity to help in the overall health improvement in the individual suffering from one, two, or all three of these symptoms.

First we’ll discuss weight loss.  One of the most important things one can do to achieve long-term weight loss and management is to set realistic goals. It may seem obvious to set realistic weight-loss goals. But do you really know what’s realistic? Over the long term, it’s best to aim for losing 1 to 2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kilogram) a week, although initially you might lose weight more quickly than that if you make significant changes — just be sure the changes are health supporting. To lose 1 to 2 pounds a week, you need to burn 500 to 1,000 calories more than you consume each day, through a lower calorie diet and regular exercise. When you’re setting goals, think about both process and outcome goals. “Exercise regularly” is an example of a process goal, while “Lose 30 pounds” is an example of an outcome goal. It isn’t essential that you have an outcome goal, but you should set process goals because changing your processes — your habits — is a key to weight loss. Also make sure that your goals are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-limited. An example of a SMART goal is aiming to walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week for the next three months, and logging your results” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Some of the health benefits that come with reducing one’s weight are increased energy levels, lower cholesterol levels (LDL, VLDL), improved breathing, improved mobility, reduced aches and pains in joints, improve sleep, decreased risk of  “coronary artery disease”, reduce or eliminate diabetes, reduce “stress” physically, emotionally, and mentally. This can be achieved by following two simple guidelines, eating healthier foods, getting and staying active.

“Adopting a new eating style that promotes weight loss must include lowering your total calorie intake. But decreasing calories need not mean giving up taste, satisfaction or even ease of meal preparation. One way you can lower your calorie intake is by eating more plant-based foods — fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Strive for variety to help you achieve your goals without giving up taste or nutrition.

In particular, get your weight loss started by eating a healthy breakfast every day; eating at least four servings of vegetables and three servings of fruits daily; and using healthy fats, such as olive oil, vegetable oils and nut butters. In addition, cut back on sugar, choose low-fat dairy products and keep meat consumption to a 3-ounce portion (about the size of a deck of cards).

While you can lose weight without exercise, exercise plus calorie restriction can help give you the weight-loss edge. Exercise can help burn off the excess calories you can’t cut through diet alone. Exercise also offers numerous health benefits, including boosting your mood, strengthening your cardiovascular system and reducing your blood pressure. Exercise can also help in maintaining weight loss. Studies show that people who maintain their weight loss over the long term get regular physical activity” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Second we have coronary artery disease (CAD). The thing with CAD as with weight management is that we as individuals make the choices that affect our lives in either a positive or negative way. By making a conscious decision to make a positive change, all you ‘ll need to do to succeed is to implement it. With CAD, there are some things that we are either born with or just develop with time. We can’t choose to change it, but we can manage them i.e. age, sex, and family history. Some of the changes that we can make are sometimes the things we’re already doing to cause them such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, high stress, and lack of sleep. With the exception of smoking and sleeping, everything else can be controlled and managed to some extent by following the guidelines from the weight loss section. Annual check ups with your physician is all a choice you can implement to monitor your heart’s health.

“Lifestyle changes can help you prevent or slow the progression of coronary artery disease.

  •                     Stop smoking. Smoking is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and forces your heart to work harder, and carbon monoxide reduces oxygen in your blood and damages the lining of your blood vessels. If you smoke, quitting is one of the best ways to reduce your risk of a heart attack.
  •                     Control your blood pressure. Ask your doctor for a blood pressure measurement at least every two years. He or she may recommend more frequent measurements if your blood pressure is higher than normal or you have a history of heart disease. The ideal blood pressure is below 120 systolic and 80 diastolic, as measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).
  •                     Check your cholesterol. Ask your doctor for a baseline cholesterol test when you’re in your 20s and then at least every five years. If your test results aren’t within desirable ranges, your doctor may recommend more frequent measurements. Most people should aim for an LDL level below 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.4 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). If you have other risk factors for heart disease, your target LDL may be below 100 mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L).
  •                     Keep diabetes under control. If you have diabetes, tight blood sugar control can help reduce the risk of heart disease.
  •                     Get moving. Exercise helps you achieve and maintain a healthy weight and control diabetes, elevated cholesterol and high blood pressure — all risk factors for coronary artery disease. With your doctor’s OK, aim for 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity most or all days of the week.
  •                     Eat healthy foods. A heart-healthy diet based on fruits, vegetables and whole grains — and low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium — can help you control your weight, blood pressure and cholesterol. Eating one or two servings of fish a week also is beneficial.
  •                     Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight increases your risk of coronary artery disease. Weight loss is especially important for people who have large waist measurements — more than 40 inches (102 centimeters) for men and more than 35 inches (89 centimeters) for women — because people with this body shape are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease.
  •                     Manage stress. Reduce stress as much as possible. Practice healthy techniques for managing stress, such as muscle relaxation and deep breathing.

In addition to healthy lifestyle changes, remember the importance of regular medical checkups. Some of the main risk factors for coronary artery disease — high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes — have no symptoms in the early stages. Early detection and treatment can set the stage for a lifetime of better heart health” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Last but not least we have stress management. I look as stress as a major component and precursor to a lot diseases and conditions we contract in our lives. If you click on this link: http://www.stress.org/topic-effects.htm, you’ll see the effects of stress on the human body both physically and emotionally. “There are numerous emotional and physical disorders that have been linked to stress including depression, anxiety, heart attacks, stroke, hypertension, immune system disturbances that increase susceptibility to infections, a host of viral linked disorders ranging from the common cold and herpes to AIDS and certain cancers, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In addition stress can have direct effects on the skin (rashes, hives, atopic dermatitis, the gastrointestinal system (GERD, peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis) and can contribute to insomnia and degenerative neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease. In fact, it’s hard to think of any disease in which stress cannot play an aggravating role or any part of the body that is not affected (see stress effects on the body stress diagram) or. This list will undoubtedly grow as the extensive ramifications of stress are increasingly being appreciated” (AIS 2009).

There are many ways to reduce stress, weight management and exercise can help reduce and control stress levels. Those are but only two, and I mentioned them specifically because like my intro, I stated that What you will probably notice is that the three components actually overlap with one another in some capacity to help in the overall health improvement in the individual suffering from one, two, or all three of these symptoms” (Hsu 2011).

There are also what I consider active and passive treatments to stress. Active is physically doing something to reduce stress levels, while passive is having an external component aiding in the reduction of stress. One is not necessarily better, it’s just options that suits the individual best. Just as stress is different for each of us there is no stress reduction strategy that is a panacea. Jogging and other aerobic exercises, different types of meditation, prayer, yoga and tai chi are great for many people but when arbitrarily imposed on others, prove dull, boring and stressful. There is certainly no shortage of stress relievers and in addition to the above, various progressive muscular relaxation exercises, autogenic training, deep breathing, massage therapies, visual imagery and self hypnosis practices are popular. There are also acupuncture, acupressure, biofeedback, Alexander, Reiki, Feldenkrais and other bodywork and postural techniques. Some people find that listening to music, hobbies, volunteer work, keeping a daily journal of events and how they feel, laughter, playing with pets, taking short breaks or shopping help them to relax. Others find relief for their stress related symptoms from aromatherapy, nutritional supplements like chamomile, spearmint, kava kava, adaptogens and St. John’s wort or even sitting under a pyramid. There are also prescription tranquilizers, sedatives, hypnotics, antidepressants and beta-blockers for specific complaints. In addition, a variety of cranioelectromagnetic stimulation devices have been found to be effective and safe for anxiety, insomnia and drug resistant depression. Strong emotional support from group therapy, family or friends is a powerful stress buster” (AIS 2009).

Reference:

Mayo Clinic staff. (2010 December, 18) Weight Loss: 6 strategies for success. Mayo Clinic.                                                  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/weight-loss/HQ01625

Mayo Clinic staff. (2010 July, 2) Coronary Artery Disease. Mayo Clinic.                                                                               http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/coronary-artery-disease/DS00064/DSECTION=lifestyle%2Dand%2Dhome%2Dremedies

The American Institute of Stress. (2009) Effects of Stress. AIS.                                                                                                                                     http://www.stress.org/topic-effects.htm

The American Institute of Stress. (2009) Stress reduction, Stress relievers. AIS.                                                                                                        http://www.stress.org/topic-reduction.htm


Accountability?

Accountability (Adjective)
Defn’- Of a person, organiztion, organiztion, or institution- required or expected to justify actions or decisions; responsible.

It is this time of year, this wonderful blissful time of year, when all the goodies, parties, social gatherings; begin to pull us away from keeping our health in check.  We forego the gym one night because we need to stop at the store instead, then we neglect to wake up to our early alarm because its just to cozy in our bed.  We find ourselves eating more than we normally would, and even eating a lot of sweets too, only causing us to want to take a nap in our ever so rare moment of free time. 

Aw yes, you know this is you!  I’ll even admit its me too… but I’m not going to give you the cliche advice and tell you to work out whenever you can.  Go for a walk, offer to do more chores and help out (although all of these things would be a HUGE benefit), what I am going to tell you this holiday season is to find a buddy to keep yourself accountable.

That’s right… a BUDDY!  Just like ‘Buddy the Elf’ would never allow any of his loved ones to have a bad day… you must do the same.  Whether your buddy is a friend, family member, co-worker, or neighbor, find a buddy that will help you push through this hectic month.  A buddy that will workout with you, helping you stay on a regular schedule.  A buddy that will check in with you, and ask you what you are eating for dinner.  A buddy that will encourage you, and help you find solutions to the roadblocks that are getting in your way of your toned little holiday butt!

When we have someone to help keep ourselves accountable we are more likely to stick to our programs.   When we have a friend that encourages us, those things that we would justify in our head, aren’t so justifiable to your buddy.  Your buddy will give you the look:  The “Are you serious? That sounds ridiculous!” look.  Having someone to keep us accountable not only gives us that extra ‘umph’ to stay on track, but also can give us meaning, purpose, and comfort in what we are trying to do.

Knowing that your friend is waiting outside in the freezing cold for you to do your morning run, can sometimes be that little wake up call that will get your warm body out of bed.  We can find relief in a buddy as they are struggling to fight those same battles we are.  Buddies offer us empathy.  They have the same goals in mind, and are overcoming the same obstacles we are to stay in shape.

So, before you give up on staying in shape this holiday season… Don’t forget there is someone else out there in need of a buddy!  You can help them and they can help you :) 

Get your ‘Buddy Plan’ started off right… come and participate in the Great Las Vegas Santa Run on Saturday December 3rd, 2011 at 10am at Town Square with Team ATP.  Your registration includes your santa suit, and we will be having a costume contest with prizes for the best ‘decked’ out santa suit.  Please let us know you will be joining us so we can forward you the meeting instructions for the morning of the race.  The link to sign up is below.

http://www.opportunityvillage.org/santa_run.php

Hope to see you there!

Stay Healthy,
Hayley Hollander (P.S.- Anyone want to be my buddy?)

 


Have a drink on me!

With the weather changing from extreme heat to colder temperatures, it is as important as ever to make sure you are properly hydrated before, during, and after you exercise. “Staying hydrated is essential for everyone, but athletes have an even greater need to maintain proper hydration. Water is the most important nutrient for life and has many important functions including regulating temperature, lubricating joints and transporting nutrients and waste throughout the body” (Quinn 2011).

What can happen through dehydration? With as little as a 2% decrease in your body weight through sweating, your heart will begin to work harder to circulate blood. Muscle cramps, dizziness, fatigue, and heat illnesses i.e. heat exhaustion and heat stroke have been known to occur. Some of the causes of dehydration include inadequate fluid intake, excessive sweating, not replacing fluids lost during and after exercise, exercising in dry extreme weather, and drinking only when thirsty.

Everyone is different when it comes to how much we sweat, how much fluids we lose through exercise, and how our hydration levels are to begin with. That being said it is difficult to provide “SPECIFIC” hydration guidelines for us to follow. Two simple assessments to see if you’re adequately hydrated are,

Monitoring urine volume output and color:

A large amount of light colored, diluted urine probably means you are hydrated; dark colored, concentrated urine probably means you are dehydrated.

Weighing yourself before and after exercise:

Any weight lost is likely from fluid, so try to drink enough to replenish those losses. Any weight gain could mean you are drinking more than you need.

How do we lose water/fluids through exercise? I’m of the opinion that we must know before hand what the environment that we are going to train in is like. We “CAN” control how we eat, sleep, move, rest and hydrate, but we can’t control the elements that Mother Nature throws our way. We are at her mercy and to an extent the same goes for our landscape (topography). Here are some things to consider,

High Altitude:

Exercising at altitude increases your fluid losses and therefore increases you fluid needs.

Temperature:

Exercising in the heat increases you fluid losses through sweating and exercise in the cold can impair you ability to recognize fluid losses and increase fluid lost through respiration. In both cases it is important to hydrate.

Sweating:

Some athletes sweat more than others. If you sweat a lot you are at greater risk for dehydration. Again, weigh yourself before and after exercise to judge sweat loss.

Exercise Duration and Intensity:

Exercising for hours (endurance sports) means you need to drink more and more frequently to avoid dehydration.

OK, so how much water and or fluids should we consume before, during, and after we exercise? If you are training regularly, you will probably need between one half and one whole ounce of water (or other fluids) for each pound of body weight per day. To determine your baseline range for water   requirements, use the following formula:

Low end of range= Body weight (lbs.) x 0.5 = (ounces of fluid/day)

High end of range=Body weight (lbs.) x 1 = (ounces of fluid/day)

For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, your approximate water requirement will be between 75 and 150 ounces each day.

When to Drink Water During Exercise:

Begin the day with a large glass of water each morning, whether it’s a training or a rest day. On training days, the following schedule works well for most athletes:

Water (Fluid) Intake Schedule

Before Exercise:

Drink two to three cups of water (16-24 oz.) within the two to three hours before your workout. Drink 8-10 fl oz. 10-15 min before exercise

Weigh yourself immediately before you begin your workout.

During Exercise:                                                        

Drink one cup (8 oz.) of water every 15 minutes.

If exercising longer than 90 minutes, drink 8-10 fl oz. of a sports drink (with no more than 8 percent carbohydrate) every 15 – 30 minutes.

After Exercise:

Weigh yourself immediately after you finish your workout.

Drink two to three cups of water (16-24 oz.) for each pound lost during exercise.

How Much Water to Drink During Endurance Exercise:

If you are exercising at a moderate to high intensity for more than 90 minutes, you will want to consume more than plain water. You need to replenish glycogen stores with easy-to-digest carbohydrate. Sports drinks can be an easy way to add the necessary energy. For longer workouts, choose a drink with 60 to 100 calories per eight ounces and consume eight to ten ounces every 15 to 30 minutes based upon your preference.

For those exercising in extreme conditions over three, four or five hours, you’ll need to replace electrolytes. A complex sports drink, NUUN tablets, or other foods will help provide the needed calories and electrolytes required for continuous performance.

“Although rare, athletes can drink too much water and suffer from hyponatremia (water intoxication). Drinking excessive amounts of water can cause a low concentration of sodium in the blood – a serious medical emergency” (Quinn 2011).

Until next time,

-Arthur-

 

Reference:

Quinn, E. (2007 December, 2) ACSM clarifies indicators for   replacement. http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/hydration/a/022504.htm

Quinn, E. (2011 April, 15) What to drink for proper hydration during exercise? http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

Quinn, E. (2011 August, 24) How much water should you drink? http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/qt/How-Much-Water-Should-You-Drink.htm


Fitness Designer? Part 2: Acute Variables

Six steps to a better program design

Part 2:

Explain how it serves to allow for proper progression/regression

In part one, I explained the 6-step program design model, and what it entails. In part two, I will show you how to regress and progress the Acute Variables.

1) Speed

A) Slow B) Medium C) Fast

 

2) Movement

A) Known B) Somewhat Known C) Unknown

 

3) Stability

A) Stable B) Moderately C) Dynamic

 

4) Force (weight)

A) Low B) Moderate C) High

 

5) Complexity (Movement)

A) Simple B) Moderate C) Complex

 

6) Surface

A) Stable B) Changing C) Dynamic

 

7) Base of Support

A) Wide (Stable) B) Narrow C) Varying (Movement)

 

8) Volume (Sets + Reps + Intensity)

A) Low B) Medium C) High

 

9) ROM (Range of Motion)

A) Small (Initial Range) B) Medium (Self Selected Range) C) Large (End Range)

 

All of the Acute Variables are written in “bold italic”, and the corresponding letters underneath represents there progressions; A= Beginner, B= Intermediate, and C= Advanced. How can we apply the AV (Acute Variables) to the 6-step program design? Let’s take a look, (you may need to refer back to part one of this three part article for reference, Sept. 12th post “Fitness Designer?” http://www.getatpblog.com).

Movement Performed: Squat

Client: Let’s say our client is a beginner who is new to exercise.  No health issues and no injuries. Their goal is to learn how to squat and in the future add challenges to their squat.

1) Orientation: Standing 2) Action: Squatting 3) Device: Bodyweight 4) Footprint: Neutral hip width (XXX) 5) Handprint: Anterior @ shoulder height and 6) Threshold:  Acute Variables (1-9), 1) Speed: Slow, since they are new to exercise, slowing the movement down will allow them to control their body better. There’s two sayings I particularly enjoy “Slow is smooth, and smooth becomes fast”, I heard from a friend of mine, and “Speed kills”. 2) Movement: Known, people squat everyday in some form or another. 3) Stability: Moderate, since my client doesn’t have an injury or is recovering from one, I will let ASK them to try to squat without holding on to anything.  I could always modify if their having trouble stabilizing, by having them hold on to a railing (A) Stable), or when they are ready to progress, I can have them squat down and stand up in the balls of their feet (C) Dynamic). 4) Force (weight): Low, my client will only be squatting their bodyweight (Keep in mind that the clients weight and strength level, can have a different affect on them, and can have a significant influence on their ability to control their Force (weight). 5) Complexity (movement): Simple, A basic down/up vertical drive. Moderate could be a down/up with a rotation at the top of the movement, and Complex could be a marching in place squat with a bicep curl to shoulder press. 6) Surface: Gym Floor, a nice flat stable surface. A Moderate surface could be squatting on a BOSU (blue side up), and a Complex could be on an INDO Board (on a roller). 7) Base of Support: Wide, if your base of support (Footprint) is wider than the center of gravity, you will have more stability i.e. Shoulder width. Moderate would be to have them stand with their feet closer together i.e. hip width or together. Varying could be a single leg (pistol) squat. 8) Volume: Low, maybe 2/3 sets, 5-7 reps or 30 seconds, and rest for 30 seconds to 1 minute depending on how they feel. If they had a heart rate monitor, I may go off of their zones and goals. Finally 9) ROM (range of motion): Medium (self select range), since my client has no injuries and is healthy, I will ASK them to go a low as they can without feeling any strain/pain. Unless I see something very abnormal that could result in injury, I will let my client explore their ROM.

This was just an example of how a fitness professional or a fitness enthusiast could utilize the 6-step program design, and the AV to mix up their exercise/movement program. This style of programming allows for a lot of creativity and play between the client and trainer, not to mention add a little fun to a routine. In part three, we will wrap up the 6-steps to a better program design, by putting this model into practice with various drills in view of integrated anatomy.

-Arthur-

References:

Michol Dalcourt. Institute of Motion. 6-steps to a better program design. IDEA World Fitness Conference, Los Angeles, Ca. August 2011


What Motivates Us?

Even though our job title is ‘personal trainer’, and the world calls us ‘personal trainers’. Bottom line… we are really behavioral change specialists.  We are hired to help people change the behaviors that got them to where they are at in that very moment. So we are left to figure out exactly how we are going to do that.  And we ultimately ask ourselves “What Motivates Us?” 

Ever wonder why sometimes giving rewards or punishing a person for a lack of performance never truly works?  In the book “Drive” by Daniel H Pink, there are numerous studies that prove to us time and time again that our belief in rewarding hard work, or rewarding a job well done, or giving a gift or prize to the fastest person actually hinders our performance.

I thought about this a little bit; in the book it gives more description to employees and the work force, but the same can be compared to exercise.  Think of all the PE teachers out there that give out prizes for the quickest mile finisher, or allow students to sit out from gym class if they do good on their test.  Or a parent that tells their child to go run around the park for hitting their sister.  All this is implying to the person who either receives the prize or gets the punishment, is that exercise is an awful thing so I either have to give you a prize so you will feel inclined to do it, or I have to punish you with exercise giving it a negative connotation.

Now as fitness professionals we have the ability to change this… and this can start in our programming from the get-go.  You see, exercise is believed to be work and not fun… and we need to change that if we are going to have any influence on the staggering and rising statistics of obesity.  The book goes on to say, “Whats more, for some people, much of what they do all day consists of the routine, not terribly captivating, tasks.  In these situations, it’s best to try to unleash the positive side of the Sawyer Effect by attempting to turn work into play- to increase the task’s variety to make it more like a game, or to use it to help master other skills.”  Now, the Sawyer effect in the book is referring to the counterintuitive consequences of extrinsic rewards.  Rewards that are given as an ‘if-then’ action elicit a negative response, where they extinguish intrinsic motivation, diminish performance, crush creativity, crowd out good behavior, encourage cheating, short cuts, and unethical behavior, they foster addiction, and they encourage short-term thinking.

So, you may be thinking to yourself, well within my program design how can I avoid using rewards but still get my clients to do the things they need to do to get to their goal?  I was wondering the same thing… it’s a whole new mind shift.

First, we have to build credibility in the task itself.  We need to offer a rationale for why the task is necessary to begin with.  If we can explain how what we are having them do will help them get to their goals.  A task that is inherently hard or uninteresting can become more meaningful to them and therefore they are more invested.

The second thing we can do is acknowledge that the task is boring.  That statement may scare you a bit… and the truth is scary. But when we acknowledge that the task is boring this is where we play the empathy card.  We can play on emotions of acknowledging how they are feeling, instead of giving them an award to complete something as is a normalacy for boring tasks, thus reiterating that it is boring, making it even more dreadful.

The third thing is to allow people to complete the task their own way.  Think autonomy here and not control.  Although there might be an outcome we are looking for within the exercise or even the workout.  Here is where we state the outcome we need, and instead of specifying precisely the way to reach it, give them freedom over how they do the job.  This will actually deter from the task in number two as being boring.  And within the Gray Institutes realm of triangulation of movement we can allow the client to move with variety, self-selecting where they want to go.  Making training variable, giving them ownership which fosters autonomy and allows the mind to become engaged in the task.  Taking away the need for reward.           

Focus on creating programs that have Autonomy, Mastery, and Purpose.  Autonomy will give them an outcome that needs to happen while giving them the ability to choose how they want to get there.  If they don’t like to run, then don’t make them run, but instead find an activity they like to do that will get them to their goal.  With Mastery, give them a task that is challenging, but only to the point where they are still successful, and as they master certain levels of the skill, they are driven to accomplish the next level.  Presenting someone with a challenge that encourages them to continue to strive to be better will only play on their own intrinsic motivators.  A program that has mastery, is demonstrated in exercise adherence and satisfaction from the client.  Lastly, purpose is the ‘why’ of what they are doing is worth it to begin with.  Purpose is what we pursue, it is the catalyst behind putting in all the effort to get to their goals.  Be sure to provide meaningful reasons of ‘why’ that correlate to the individual’s goals, and it will remind them the direction they are going when the going gets tough.

Ultimately what motivates us to do anything are tasks that encourage autonomy, mastery and purpose.  When we supply these in our training programs, we build a foundation to help encourage change, not only in their body as their tissues are left to guess what is happening and adapt, but also mentally as we are giving them workouts that are challenging mentally/emotionally/and physically.  If we find tasks that give AUTONOMY, MASTERY, AND PURPOSE then we as personal trainers are recognizing that we really are behavioral change specialists.

So, before you revert to a reward or punishment, think carefully about the message that conveys to the clients’ motivation towards exercise.

Hayley Hollander


Fitness Designer?

This week we will begin to take a look at one of the many ways to design a program.

The reason why I say “many ways” is because there should never be in my opinion “ONE “ way to do anything.  Variety as the say is the spice of life. The program I will be discussing will come from The Institute of Motion (IoM) and it’s director Michol Dalcourt. Michol presented this concept at the 2011 IDEA World Conference as “6 steps to better program design” and he broke it down to three main objectives; (a) explain the 6-step program design model. (b)Explain how it serves to allow for proper progression/regression and (c) Put this model into practice with various drills in view of integrated anatomy. IoM (2011). In part one of my three-part breakdown, I will introduce the 6-step program design model. Allow me to preface the model by stating that the body has to constantly battle forces. “Gravity and Ground Reaction Forces (GRF) are two paramount’s we deal with everyday.”MIchol Dalcourt (2011)

How we move through those forces and how we apply them to a training program can mean the difference between progressing and regressing our fitness levels and coincidentally our health. The six main steps outlined in this program are orientation, action, device, footprint, handprint, and threshold. Let’s review briefly what each step represents and/or entails;

-Orientation: Refers to which way your body will be positioned in relation to gravity and ground i.e. standing, sitting, lying face down, face up etc.

- Action: What movement are you going to perform? What is the body doing? Are you changing levels? Are you using stationary force? Are you using locomotion?

-Device: What tools or external load are you choosing? TRX Suspension Trainers, ViPR’s, Kettlebells, Barbells, and why?

- Footprint: Refers to your stance and/or foot Action you are performing.

-Handprint: Refers to your hand position or hand Action you are performing.

-Threshold: Applying acute variables i.e. sets, reps, time, rest, weight, range of motion (ROM), speed, etc.

For the fitness professionals reading this blog try implementing this six step PDM into your own workouts first, see how you like it. Does it add a new/different dimension to your routine? Once you feel you have a basic grasp of the six steps and have practiced it, try slowly integrating the six step concept into your clients routine. Remember, “regression is a must, progression is earned” Acea Theroux (2011 TRX ITC).

In part two I will explain how the six step design model allows for proper progression /regression of our Actions.

 

-Arthur-

 

References:

Michol Dalcourt- Institute of Motion, 2011 IDEA World Fitness Conference, Los Angeles, Ca

 

Acea Theroux- TRX STC ITC Sept. 2011, Instructor Candidate.

 


Defining what we do

In my Hsu’s

It’s not the load that breaks you down, it’s the way you carry it. -Lou Holtz

Functional Training? Functionalist?

In the fitness industry, “IT” words can sell what ever it is that you want to market. One of the all time great words is “Core”. Another one that been thrown around for quite some time now is “Functional Training”. This week, I will discuss Functional Training, not to bash it or edify the term, but to simply explain it.

Functional Training:

To examine each part in an attempt to determine the role it plays in the operating of the system (body) as a whole. When any part fails, this creates a problem for the whole. These failures and/or dysfunctions upset the equilibrium of the system and could become a problem physically, emotionally, and mentally. This may negatively affect one’s behavior and lifestyle.

For the Fitness Professional, anything that impedes the body’s ability to achieve its goal is by definition “dysfunction”. The system will take care of itself as a whole first and will do so at he expense of its individual parts. It is this constant struggle between what the clients or we want (Extrinsic Goals) vs. what we or the clients needs (Intrinsic Goals), that could eventually put the health and fitness of everyone at risk.

To “Functionally Train” one must try to examine and understand how different postures, movements, behavior patterns and lifestyle choices affect the way we “Function”.

-Arthur-

Credits:

By. Harold A. Widdison and H.Richard Delany

Social Problems: Definitions, Theories, and Analysis

Chapter 1 from Annual Editions: Social Problems 10/11

37th. Edition by Finsterbusch 4


The Importance of Heart Rate Training

Have you ever worked out and wondered if what you were doing was getting you to your goals? Heart rate training is important when reaching one’s individuals goals, as it dictates the intensity of your workouts. Knowing when to kick it up into high gear or when you need to recover is pertinent to reaching your goals. Heart rate training does all that for you and reduces the risk of “Over Training”!

Watch this video to see how ATP Co-Founders Arthur Hsu and Hayley Hollander utilize heart rate training, and how heart rate training is variable amongst every individual.

Thank you,

Hayley Hollander and Arthur Hsu


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