Posts tagged “exercise

My Sixth Sense…

When I graduated high school, believe it or not, I was Valedictorian… I know, I know, SUPER GEEK!

Along with my geek crown, came that graduation speech I had to give.  The theme of graduation centered around “famous heroes”, I chose specifically to talk about Helen Keller.  Helen Keller was a hero to many and paved the way for individuals with disabilities who were blind, deaf, and both.  Helen Keller was blind AND deaf!

What makes Helen a hero in my eyes is that despite her inability to see, or hear, she still learned to communicate, AND was the first deaf/blind person to get her Bachelor of Arts degree.  Helen showed us that what most of us believe is vital to communicate MAY NOT be so vital.

Helen used her sense of touch to learn braille, which is almost unfathomable, considering she got no verbal affirmation of what she was even learning!  Then to speak back, she learned sign language, by again using her sense of touch to feel the gestures of someone else’s hands without seeing what they were doing.  To most, and it did to me, this task that Helen embarked on seemed impossible… But then I took a step back and realized that Helen wasn’t lacking anything at all, in fact because she was stripped of our basic everyday inputs, she was capable of being more aware of what we subconsciously take for granted.

Helen communicated from the energy, and the vibrations in the room.  The vibrations and their strengths, pitches, and even tempos helped her to learn a sixth sense that most of us never encounter.  She could feel someone else’s emotions and energy just by feeling heart rates, tempo of steps in and out of a room, a brush of air around her, a cease of movement, the strength of light and the shadows and shapes she could barely make out.  Helen brought to the table something we neglect every single day, but can give us the most telling and honest information about another human being, our sixth sense.

I believe our sixth sense is… NO, not seeing dead people, I believe our sixth sense is EMPATHY!  Empathy to its greatest power is being so in tune with the people around us, that we forgo the burgeoning bias that eyes give us, the distracting sounds and words that pull us away from what we should really be hearing.  Empathy, as our sixth sense, is a way of connecting with someone on the deepest level, where the very rhythm in which they communicate to us is met through the rhythm at which we listen.  Empathy can allow someone to match another heart beat for heart beat, blink of an eye to blink of eye, breath for breath, and movement for movement.  It is this symbiotic sense that creates relationships and builds on our ability to accomplish tasks, just as Helen Keller overcame the impossible.  She conquered because she didn’t have to go through all of the distracting filters we clutter our communication with every single day.

So, here’s my challenge to you…  Let go of one of your filters, and learn to listen on a whole new level, using your sixth sense.  You might be surprised at not only what your neighbor is saying, or what your environment is saying, BUT what your own body is saying.  Be empathetic towards yourself, and listen to what your body is trying to subconsciously tell you, and the power you will hold will be insurmountable!  Remember it is not just listening, or just feeling, but it’s… what are you experiencing?  Empathy holds the key to unlock many of life’s mysteries.

Move Move,
Hayley Hollander


Short and Sweet… and To The Point!

For many of our fans who have attended our boot camp classes, you’ve experienced a type of work out that involves short periods of intense exercise followed by light exercise or rest.  You may think its just the way we run the class, but actually there is a method to the madness.

You see we are programming intervals, and what Arthur and I are so diligently watching on the heart rate screen is that you are all working anaerobically and then recovering to an aerobic zone.  In the world of personal training, we call it interval training.

Interval training provides the body with intense bouts of exercise followed by light bouts of activity to allow the body to recover.  During the intense bouts of exercise, the body is in need of delivering oxygen to the working muscle more quickly as the demand placed on the body becomes greater and greater through the duration of the exercise.  You will see your breathing rate increase as the working muscles are seeking more oxygen, and then of course your heart rate will increase too to deliver that oxygenated blood to the working muscles.  During interval training, as the exercise intensity increases there is a point when the body can no longer deliver oxygen to the working muscles quick enough; so our body instead uses our Anaerobic (without oxygen) energy system.  Think of your Anaerobic energy system as the stuff already stored in the tissues for fuel (its like a stop and the ‘convenient store, instead of the grocery store- simply quicker energy).

When we train anaerobically our heart rate is increased, our breathing is labored, and its difficult for anyone to sustain intense exercise for very long.  So, if it feels intense and it’s hard to sustain, why even bother training this way?  Well, there are MULTIPLE benefits to training this way.

1- Your body burns up to 5 calories for every liter of oxygen consumed
*When we increase our heart rate by doing more intense exercise, we increase our oxygen intake, and therefore increase our caloric burn.
2- What goes up must come down!
*When we increase our heart rate and oxygen consumption during intense exercise, our body will seek to go back to it’s homeostatic state.  We burn many calories to get back to our resting state, through replenishing cellular supplies with much needed nutrients, and using up nutrients to repair the worked tissue.
3- Increased aerobic capacity
*When training in the various heart rate gears and you go up and down frequently, it allows us to increase the strength of the heart as a muscle, as well as improve cardiac output during and after exercise.  One long term benefit will be an increased anaerobic threshold, or the ability of the body to utilize fat and oxygen for fuel without turning anaerobic too quickly; allowing us to sustain exercise for longer before feeling fatigued.
4- Increased Lean Muscle Mass
*By doing interval training we are stressing the tissues at the cellular level, promoting growth and regeneration both hormonally and structurally.

Bottom Line… We burn more calories, we train the ENTIRE body (cellular and structural), and we build a healthy cardio-respiratory system equipped to meet the stressful demands of everyday life.

So, before you think you need to go out and do a long sustained workout at a steady state intensity; ask yourself if you want more bang for your buck and keep it short and sweet and to the point, loaded with high intensity intervals!

Move More!
Hayley Hollander

Reference: http://www.greatist.com/fitness/interval-training-complete-guide/

 


Moments of Movement

I recently was intrigued by an article I read on PtontheNet written by Mr. John Berardi, a leading nutritionist, author, and presenter in the fitness industry.

He relayed his feeling of frustration about the constant inundation the media portrays of ‘quick fix’ diets and workout plans.  I mean, can we really get in shape in just 10 minutes a day?  Berardi, despite his angst, decided to take a whole new look at these quick fixes, and while applying fundamental principles made the complex simple for one client.

By instilling small, attainable goals for his ‘tester’ client he was able to help her achieve a larger goal of ‘maintained weight loss.’  His simple program looked like this:

Monday – 6 minutes of sprint intervals on the treadmill
Tuesday – 10 minutes of bodyweight circuit training
Thursday – 6 minutes of sprint intervals on the treadmill
Friday – 10 minutes of bodyweight circuit training
[That’s right, only 32 minutes of exercise per week.]
Her dietary strategies were equally simple:
Weeks 1 and 2
– eat normally, however eat each meal slowly and eat about 4 total meals each day
Weeks 3 and 4 – with each meal, eat protein, legumes, and veggies (while avoiding white carbs)
Weeks 5 and 6 – one day per week, eat whatever you want
Weeks 7 and 8 – if still included, skip fruit and calorie-containing drinks

Simple right?  That’s what I thought!

Which made me wonder if I have been overwhelming my own clients with too many to do’s in their workout programs. If not, then I say to you “maintain the course.”  If yes, then I apologize, and may I encourage you to instead look for “Moments of Movement.”

Let’s keep it simple.  Look for moments during your day to move. Move in your own way, and for as long as you have time to in each moment you choose.  Break up your moments, and allow the body to do what it likes to do.  These moments, collectively by the end of every week can help you get to your goal. 

For example, my client Mary spoke of one of her memorable moments of movement.  On a long car ride, across several states, and accompanied by two aunts who loved to move, found themselves playing “Auto Aerobics.”  This moment of movement was a game in which all the passengers in the car took turns coming up with an exercise/movement they could do with their arms.  After much laughter, many silly movements, and almost an hour of passed time, they found a moment of movement that they will never forget.

As with Mary’s example, let’s keep the complex simple, and just move!  And to all of my clients… I want you to worry about having fun and moving when, where, and how much you want… I’ll take care of the rest when I see you.

Until then… MOVE MORE!
Hayley Hollander

To see John Berardi’s article in full click the link:
Exploring Fitness Minimalism


Menage Trois ;)

Get your head out of the gutter folks! Below was a question my professor asked in my anatomy/physiology course. I thought it was worth sharing.

What are some lifestyle changes a person can make to help to improve overall health?  List at least 3 and describe the benefits of each.

In my opinion, the 3 very important factors for a positive lifestyle change in an individual to improve overall health is, weight loss, coronary artery disease, and stress. What you will probably notice is that the three components actually overlap with one another in some capacity to help in the overall health improvement in the individual suffering from one, two, or all three of these symptoms.

First we’ll discuss weight loss.  One of the most important things one can do to achieve long-term weight loss and management is to set realistic goals. It may seem obvious to set realistic weight-loss goals. But do you really know what’s realistic? Over the long term, it’s best to aim for losing 1 to 2 pounds (0.5 to 1 kilogram) a week, although initially you might lose weight more quickly than that if you make significant changes — just be sure the changes are health supporting. To lose 1 to 2 pounds a week, you need to burn 500 to 1,000 calories more than you consume each day, through a lower calorie diet and regular exercise. When you’re setting goals, think about both process and outcome goals. “Exercise regularly” is an example of a process goal, while “Lose 30 pounds” is an example of an outcome goal. It isn’t essential that you have an outcome goal, but you should set process goals because changing your processes — your habits — is a key to weight loss. Also make sure that your goals are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-limited. An example of a SMART goal is aiming to walk for 30 minutes a day, five days a week for the next three months, and logging your results” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Some of the health benefits that come with reducing one’s weight are increased energy levels, lower cholesterol levels (LDL, VLDL), improved breathing, improved mobility, reduced aches and pains in joints, improve sleep, decreased risk of  “coronary artery disease”, reduce or eliminate diabetes, reduce “stress” physically, emotionally, and mentally. This can be achieved by following two simple guidelines, eating healthier foods, getting and staying active.

“Adopting a new eating style that promotes weight loss must include lowering your total calorie intake. But decreasing calories need not mean giving up taste, satisfaction or even ease of meal preparation. One way you can lower your calorie intake is by eating more plant-based foods — fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Strive for variety to help you achieve your goals without giving up taste or nutrition.

In particular, get your weight loss started by eating a healthy breakfast every day; eating at least four servings of vegetables and three servings of fruits daily; and using healthy fats, such as olive oil, vegetable oils and nut butters. In addition, cut back on sugar, choose low-fat dairy products and keep meat consumption to a 3-ounce portion (about the size of a deck of cards).

While you can lose weight without exercise, exercise plus calorie restriction can help give you the weight-loss edge. Exercise can help burn off the excess calories you can’t cut through diet alone. Exercise also offers numerous health benefits, including boosting your mood, strengthening your cardiovascular system and reducing your blood pressure. Exercise can also help in maintaining weight loss. Studies show that people who maintain their weight loss over the long term get regular physical activity” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Second we have coronary artery disease (CAD). The thing with CAD as with weight management is that we as individuals make the choices that affect our lives in either a positive or negative way. By making a conscious decision to make a positive change, all you ‘ll need to do to succeed is to implement it. With CAD, there are some things that we are either born with or just develop with time. We can’t choose to change it, but we can manage them i.e. age, sex, and family history. Some of the changes that we can make are sometimes the things we’re already doing to cause them such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, high stress, and lack of sleep. With the exception of smoking and sleeping, everything else can be controlled and managed to some extent by following the guidelines from the weight loss section. Annual check ups with your physician is all a choice you can implement to monitor your heart’s health.

“Lifestyle changes can help you prevent or slow the progression of coronary artery disease.

  •                     Stop smoking. Smoking is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Nicotine constricts blood vessels and forces your heart to work harder, and carbon monoxide reduces oxygen in your blood and damages the lining of your blood vessels. If you smoke, quitting is one of the best ways to reduce your risk of a heart attack.
  •                     Control your blood pressure. Ask your doctor for a blood pressure measurement at least every two years. He or she may recommend more frequent measurements if your blood pressure is higher than normal or you have a history of heart disease. The ideal blood pressure is below 120 systolic and 80 diastolic, as measured in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).
  •                     Check your cholesterol. Ask your doctor for a baseline cholesterol test when you’re in your 20s and then at least every five years. If your test results aren’t within desirable ranges, your doctor may recommend more frequent measurements. Most people should aim for an LDL level below 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.4 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). If you have other risk factors for heart disease, your target LDL may be below 100 mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L).
  •                     Keep diabetes under control. If you have diabetes, tight blood sugar control can help reduce the risk of heart disease.
  •                     Get moving. Exercise helps you achieve and maintain a healthy weight and control diabetes, elevated cholesterol and high blood pressure — all risk factors for coronary artery disease. With your doctor’s OK, aim for 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity most or all days of the week.
  •                     Eat healthy foods. A heart-healthy diet based on fruits, vegetables and whole grains — and low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium — can help you control your weight, blood pressure and cholesterol. Eating one or two servings of fish a week also is beneficial.
  •                     Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight increases your risk of coronary artery disease. Weight loss is especially important for people who have large waist measurements — more than 40 inches (102 centimeters) for men and more than 35 inches (89 centimeters) for women — because people with this body shape are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease.
  •                     Manage stress. Reduce stress as much as possible. Practice healthy techniques for managing stress, such as muscle relaxation and deep breathing.

In addition to healthy lifestyle changes, remember the importance of regular medical checkups. Some of the main risk factors for coronary artery disease — high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes — have no symptoms in the early stages. Early detection and treatment can set the stage for a lifetime of better heart health” (Mayo clinic staff 2010).

Last but not least we have stress management. I look as stress as a major component and precursor to a lot diseases and conditions we contract in our lives. If you click on this link: http://www.stress.org/topic-effects.htm, you’ll see the effects of stress on the human body both physically and emotionally. “There are numerous emotional and physical disorders that have been linked to stress including depression, anxiety, heart attacks, stroke, hypertension, immune system disturbances that increase susceptibility to infections, a host of viral linked disorders ranging from the common cold and herpes to AIDS and certain cancers, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In addition stress can have direct effects on the skin (rashes, hives, atopic dermatitis, the gastrointestinal system (GERD, peptic ulcer, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis) and can contribute to insomnia and degenerative neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease. In fact, it’s hard to think of any disease in which stress cannot play an aggravating role or any part of the body that is not affected (see stress effects on the body stress diagram) or. This list will undoubtedly grow as the extensive ramifications of stress are increasingly being appreciated” (AIS 2009).

There are many ways to reduce stress, weight management and exercise can help reduce and control stress levels. Those are but only two, and I mentioned them specifically because like my intro, I stated that What you will probably notice is that the three components actually overlap with one another in some capacity to help in the overall health improvement in the individual suffering from one, two, or all three of these symptoms” (Hsu 2011).

There are also what I consider active and passive treatments to stress. Active is physically doing something to reduce stress levels, while passive is having an external component aiding in the reduction of stress. One is not necessarily better, it’s just options that suits the individual best. Just as stress is different for each of us there is no stress reduction strategy that is a panacea. Jogging and other aerobic exercises, different types of meditation, prayer, yoga and tai chi are great for many people but when arbitrarily imposed on others, prove dull, boring and stressful. There is certainly no shortage of stress relievers and in addition to the above, various progressive muscular relaxation exercises, autogenic training, deep breathing, massage therapies, visual imagery and self hypnosis practices are popular. There are also acupuncture, acupressure, biofeedback, Alexander, Reiki, Feldenkrais and other bodywork and postural techniques. Some people find that listening to music, hobbies, volunteer work, keeping a daily journal of events and how they feel, laughter, playing with pets, taking short breaks or shopping help them to relax. Others find relief for their stress related symptoms from aromatherapy, nutritional supplements like chamomile, spearmint, kava kava, adaptogens and St. John’s wort or even sitting under a pyramid. There are also prescription tranquilizers, sedatives, hypnotics, antidepressants and beta-blockers for specific complaints. In addition, a variety of cranioelectromagnetic stimulation devices have been found to be effective and safe for anxiety, insomnia and drug resistant depression. Strong emotional support from group therapy, family or friends is a powerful stress buster” (AIS 2009).

Reference:

Mayo Clinic staff. (2010 December, 18) Weight Loss: 6 strategies for success. Mayo Clinic.                                                  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/weight-loss/HQ01625

Mayo Clinic staff. (2010 July, 2) Coronary Artery Disease. Mayo Clinic.                                                                               http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/coronary-artery-disease/DS00064/DSECTION=lifestyle%2Dand%2Dhome%2Dremedies

The American Institute of Stress. (2009) Effects of Stress. AIS.                                                                                                                                     http://www.stress.org/topic-effects.htm

The American Institute of Stress. (2009) Stress reduction, Stress relievers. AIS.                                                                                                        http://www.stress.org/topic-reduction.htm


Accountability?

Accountability (Adjective)
Defn’- Of a person, organiztion, organiztion, or institution- required or expected to justify actions or decisions; responsible.

It is this time of year, this wonderful blissful time of year, when all the goodies, parties, social gatherings; begin to pull us away from keeping our health in check.  We forego the gym one night because we need to stop at the store instead, then we neglect to wake up to our early alarm because its just to cozy in our bed.  We find ourselves eating more than we normally would, and even eating a lot of sweets too, only causing us to want to take a nap in our ever so rare moment of free time. 

Aw yes, you know this is you!  I’ll even admit its me too… but I’m not going to give you the cliche advice and tell you to work out whenever you can.  Go for a walk, offer to do more chores and help out (although all of these things would be a HUGE benefit), what I am going to tell you this holiday season is to find a buddy to keep yourself accountable.

That’s right… a BUDDY!  Just like ‘Buddy the Elf’ would never allow any of his loved ones to have a bad day… you must do the same.  Whether your buddy is a friend, family member, co-worker, or neighbor, find a buddy that will help you push through this hectic month.  A buddy that will workout with you, helping you stay on a regular schedule.  A buddy that will check in with you, and ask you what you are eating for dinner.  A buddy that will encourage you, and help you find solutions to the roadblocks that are getting in your way of your toned little holiday butt!

When we have someone to help keep ourselves accountable we are more likely to stick to our programs.   When we have a friend that encourages us, those things that we would justify in our head, aren’t so justifiable to your buddy.  Your buddy will give you the look:  The “Are you serious? That sounds ridiculous!” look.  Having someone to keep us accountable not only gives us that extra ‘umph’ to stay on track, but also can give us meaning, purpose, and comfort in what we are trying to do.

Knowing that your friend is waiting outside in the freezing cold for you to do your morning run, can sometimes be that little wake up call that will get your warm body out of bed.  We can find relief in a buddy as they are struggling to fight those same battles we are.  Buddies offer us empathy.  They have the same goals in mind, and are overcoming the same obstacles we are to stay in shape.

So, before you give up on staying in shape this holiday season… Don’t forget there is someone else out there in need of a buddy!  You can help them and they can help you :) 

Get your ‘Buddy Plan’ started off right… come and participate in the Great Las Vegas Santa Run on Saturday December 3rd, 2011 at 10am at Town Square with Team ATP.  Your registration includes your santa suit, and we will be having a costume contest with prizes for the best ‘decked’ out santa suit.  Please let us know you will be joining us so we can forward you the meeting instructions for the morning of the race.  The link to sign up is below.

http://www.opportunityvillage.org/santa_run.php

Hope to see you there!

Stay Healthy,
Hayley Hollander (P.S.- Anyone want to be my buddy?)

 


Have a drink on me!

With the weather changing from extreme heat to colder temperatures, it is as important as ever to make sure you are properly hydrated before, during, and after you exercise. “Staying hydrated is essential for everyone, but athletes have an even greater need to maintain proper hydration. Water is the most important nutrient for life and has many important functions including regulating temperature, lubricating joints and transporting nutrients and waste throughout the body” (Quinn 2011).

What can happen through dehydration? With as little as a 2% decrease in your body weight through sweating, your heart will begin to work harder to circulate blood. Muscle cramps, dizziness, fatigue, and heat illnesses i.e. heat exhaustion and heat stroke have been known to occur. Some of the causes of dehydration include inadequate fluid intake, excessive sweating, not replacing fluids lost during and after exercise, exercising in dry extreme weather, and drinking only when thirsty.

Everyone is different when it comes to how much we sweat, how much fluids we lose through exercise, and how our hydration levels are to begin with. That being said it is difficult to provide “SPECIFIC” hydration guidelines for us to follow. Two simple assessments to see if you’re adequately hydrated are,

Monitoring urine volume output and color:

A large amount of light colored, diluted urine probably means you are hydrated; dark colored, concentrated urine probably means you are dehydrated.

Weighing yourself before and after exercise:

Any weight lost is likely from fluid, so try to drink enough to replenish those losses. Any weight gain could mean you are drinking more than you need.

How do we lose water/fluids through exercise? I’m of the opinion that we must know before hand what the environment that we are going to train in is like. We “CAN” control how we eat, sleep, move, rest and hydrate, but we can’t control the elements that Mother Nature throws our way. We are at her mercy and to an extent the same goes for our landscape (topography). Here are some things to consider,

High Altitude:

Exercising at altitude increases your fluid losses and therefore increases you fluid needs.

Temperature:

Exercising in the heat increases you fluid losses through sweating and exercise in the cold can impair you ability to recognize fluid losses and increase fluid lost through respiration. In both cases it is important to hydrate.

Sweating:

Some athletes sweat more than others. If you sweat a lot you are at greater risk for dehydration. Again, weigh yourself before and after exercise to judge sweat loss.

Exercise Duration and Intensity:

Exercising for hours (endurance sports) means you need to drink more and more frequently to avoid dehydration.

OK, so how much water and or fluids should we consume before, during, and after we exercise? If you are training regularly, you will probably need between one half and one whole ounce of water (or other fluids) for each pound of body weight per day. To determine your baseline range for water   requirements, use the following formula:

Low end of range= Body weight (lbs.) x 0.5 = (ounces of fluid/day)

High end of range=Body weight (lbs.) x 1 = (ounces of fluid/day)

For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, your approximate water requirement will be between 75 and 150 ounces each day.

When to Drink Water During Exercise:

Begin the day with a large glass of water each morning, whether it’s a training or a rest day. On training days, the following schedule works well for most athletes:

Water (Fluid) Intake Schedule

Before Exercise:

Drink two to three cups of water (16-24 oz.) within the two to three hours before your workout. Drink 8-10 fl oz. 10-15 min before exercise

Weigh yourself immediately before you begin your workout.

During Exercise:                                                        

Drink one cup (8 oz.) of water every 15 minutes.

If exercising longer than 90 minutes, drink 8-10 fl oz. of a sports drink (with no more than 8 percent carbohydrate) every 15 – 30 minutes.

After Exercise:

Weigh yourself immediately after you finish your workout.

Drink two to three cups of water (16-24 oz.) for each pound lost during exercise.

How Much Water to Drink During Endurance Exercise:

If you are exercising at a moderate to high intensity for more than 90 minutes, you will want to consume more than plain water. You need to replenish glycogen stores with easy-to-digest carbohydrate. Sports drinks can be an easy way to add the necessary energy. For longer workouts, choose a drink with 60 to 100 calories per eight ounces and consume eight to ten ounces every 15 to 30 minutes based upon your preference.

For those exercising in extreme conditions over three, four or five hours, you’ll need to replace electrolytes. A complex sports drink, NUUN tablets, or other foods will help provide the needed calories and electrolytes required for continuous performance.

“Although rare, athletes can drink too much water and suffer from hyponatremia (water intoxication). Drinking excessive amounts of water can cause a low concentration of sodium in the blood – a serious medical emergency” (Quinn 2011).

Until next time,

-Arthur-

 

Reference:

Quinn, E. (2007 December, 2) ACSM clarifies indicators for   replacement. http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/hydration/a/022504.htm

Quinn, E. (2011 April, 15) What to drink for proper hydration during exercise? http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/a/ProperHydration.htm

Quinn, E. (2011 August, 24) How much water should you drink? http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/hydrationandfluid/qt/How-Much-Water-Should-You-Drink.htm


Fitness Designer? Part 2: Acute Variables

Six steps to a better program design

Part 2:

Explain how it serves to allow for proper progression/regression

In part one, I explained the 6-step program design model, and what it entails. In part two, I will show you how to regress and progress the Acute Variables.

1) Speed

A) Slow B) Medium C) Fast

 

2) Movement

A) Known B) Somewhat Known C) Unknown

 

3) Stability

A) Stable B) Moderately C) Dynamic

 

4) Force (weight)

A) Low B) Moderate C) High

 

5) Complexity (Movement)

A) Simple B) Moderate C) Complex

 

6) Surface

A) Stable B) Changing C) Dynamic

 

7) Base of Support

A) Wide (Stable) B) Narrow C) Varying (Movement)

 

8) Volume (Sets + Reps + Intensity)

A) Low B) Medium C) High

 

9) ROM (Range of Motion)

A) Small (Initial Range) B) Medium (Self Selected Range) C) Large (End Range)

 

All of the Acute Variables are written in “bold italic”, and the corresponding letters underneath represents there progressions; A= Beginner, B= Intermediate, and C= Advanced. How can we apply the AV (Acute Variables) to the 6-step program design? Let’s take a look, (you may need to refer back to part one of this three part article for reference, Sept. 12th post “Fitness Designer?” http://www.getatpblog.com).

Movement Performed: Squat

Client: Let’s say our client is a beginner who is new to exercise.  No health issues and no injuries. Their goal is to learn how to squat and in the future add challenges to their squat.

1) Orientation: Standing 2) Action: Squatting 3) Device: Bodyweight 4) Footprint: Neutral hip width (XXX) 5) Handprint: Anterior @ shoulder height and 6) Threshold:  Acute Variables (1-9), 1) Speed: Slow, since they are new to exercise, slowing the movement down will allow them to control their body better. There’s two sayings I particularly enjoy “Slow is smooth, and smooth becomes fast”, I heard from a friend of mine, and “Speed kills”. 2) Movement: Known, people squat everyday in some form or another. 3) Stability: Moderate, since my client doesn’t have an injury or is recovering from one, I will let ASK them to try to squat without holding on to anything.  I could always modify if their having trouble stabilizing, by having them hold on to a railing (A) Stable), or when they are ready to progress, I can have them squat down and stand up in the balls of their feet (C) Dynamic). 4) Force (weight): Low, my client will only be squatting their bodyweight (Keep in mind that the clients weight and strength level, can have a different affect on them, and can have a significant influence on their ability to control their Force (weight). 5) Complexity (movement): Simple, A basic down/up vertical drive. Moderate could be a down/up with a rotation at the top of the movement, and Complex could be a marching in place squat with a bicep curl to shoulder press. 6) Surface: Gym Floor, a nice flat stable surface. A Moderate surface could be squatting on a BOSU (blue side up), and a Complex could be on an INDO Board (on a roller). 7) Base of Support: Wide, if your base of support (Footprint) is wider than the center of gravity, you will have more stability i.e. Shoulder width. Moderate would be to have them stand with their feet closer together i.e. hip width or together. Varying could be a single leg (pistol) squat. 8) Volume: Low, maybe 2/3 sets, 5-7 reps or 30 seconds, and rest for 30 seconds to 1 minute depending on how they feel. If they had a heart rate monitor, I may go off of their zones and goals. Finally 9) ROM (range of motion): Medium (self select range), since my client has no injuries and is healthy, I will ASK them to go a low as they can without feeling any strain/pain. Unless I see something very abnormal that could result in injury, I will let my client explore their ROM.

This was just an example of how a fitness professional or a fitness enthusiast could utilize the 6-step program design, and the AV to mix up their exercise/movement program. This style of programming allows for a lot of creativity and play between the client and trainer, not to mention add a little fun to a routine. In part three, we will wrap up the 6-steps to a better program design, by putting this model into practice with various drills in view of integrated anatomy.

-Arthur-

References:

Michol Dalcourt. Institute of Motion. 6-steps to a better program design. IDEA World Fitness Conference, Los Angeles, Ca. August 2011


Fitness Designer?

This week we will begin to take a look at one of the many ways to design a program.

The reason why I say “many ways” is because there should never be in my opinion “ONE “ way to do anything.  Variety as the say is the spice of life. The program I will be discussing will come from The Institute of Motion (IoM) and it’s director Michol Dalcourt. Michol presented this concept at the 2011 IDEA World Conference as “6 steps to better program design” and he broke it down to three main objectives; (a) explain the 6-step program design model. (b)Explain how it serves to allow for proper progression/regression and (c) Put this model into practice with various drills in view of integrated anatomy. IoM (2011). In part one of my three-part breakdown, I will introduce the 6-step program design model. Allow me to preface the model by stating that the body has to constantly battle forces. “Gravity and Ground Reaction Forces (GRF) are two paramount’s we deal with everyday.”MIchol Dalcourt (2011)

How we move through those forces and how we apply them to a training program can mean the difference between progressing and regressing our fitness levels and coincidentally our health. The six main steps outlined in this program are orientation, action, device, footprint, handprint, and threshold. Let’s review briefly what each step represents and/or entails;

-Orientation: Refers to which way your body will be positioned in relation to gravity and ground i.e. standing, sitting, lying face down, face up etc.

- Action: What movement are you going to perform? What is the body doing? Are you changing levels? Are you using stationary force? Are you using locomotion?

-Device: What tools or external load are you choosing? TRX Suspension Trainers, ViPR’s, Kettlebells, Barbells, and why?

- Footprint: Refers to your stance and/or foot Action you are performing.

-Handprint: Refers to your hand position or hand Action you are performing.

-Threshold: Applying acute variables i.e. sets, reps, time, rest, weight, range of motion (ROM), speed, etc.

For the fitness professionals reading this blog try implementing this six step PDM into your own workouts first, see how you like it. Does it add a new/different dimension to your routine? Once you feel you have a basic grasp of the six steps and have practiced it, try slowly integrating the six step concept into your clients routine. Remember, “regression is a must, progression is earned” Acea Theroux (2011 TRX ITC).

In part two I will explain how the six step design model allows for proper progression /regression of our Actions.

 

-Arthur-

 

References:

Michol Dalcourt- Institute of Motion, 2011 IDEA World Fitness Conference, Los Angeles, Ca

 

Acea Theroux- TRX STC ITC Sept. 2011, Instructor Candidate.

 


The Importance of Heart Rate Training

Have you ever worked out and wondered if what you were doing was getting you to your goals? Heart rate training is important when reaching one’s individuals goals, as it dictates the intensity of your workouts. Knowing when to kick it up into high gear or when you need to recover is pertinent to reaching your goals. Heart rate training does all that for you and reduces the risk of “Over Training”!

Watch this video to see how ATP Co-Founders Arthur Hsu and Hayley Hollander utilize heart rate training, and how heart rate training is variable amongst every individual.

Thank you,

Hayley Hollander and Arthur Hsu


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