Fitness

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY TO ALL YOU AMAZING DADS!

I want to give a little shout out to my pops for his consistent love, leadership, playful spirit and letting me think I’m pretty rad when it comes to the outdoors.  I mean, I feel like a bad ass when I get to tell people I go backpacking every summer, have hiked many 14ers, and started skiing when I was 3.  Then, I remember two things: one, I grew up in Colorado and look like a novice compared to the masses and two, all props go to my Dad for instilling an adventurous, healthy lifestyle in me from the get go.

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Here are 10 memories of connecting with my Dad through movement and how he led by example as my young, impressionable eyes watched him each day.

10.  When my brother, sister and I were little, our parents would make a blanket bed in a wheelbarrow and as we all laid in it and gazed at the stars, they would take us on a walk. (Great full body workout for all you dad’s and mom’s out there)

9.  Screaming with excitement and thrill as my wide eyes watched trees fly by in the birdie-light attached behind my Dad’s mountain bike. (It’s hard to beat a good bike ride  when it comes to a cardio and leg workout)

8.  Taking our dogs on morning walks together before heading to the bus stop. (getting your body moving first thing in the morning boosts your metabolism and mood for the day)

7.  Sharing his daily jogging journal with me…way before I had any interest. (setting goals and keeping track of them is essential to any program, especially a health and fitness program)

6.  Having a stretching poster hung up in their room I would sneak in and imitate the pictures.  (daily visual and mental reminders can help keep you on track)

5.  Spending hours with me at rhythmic gymnastics, encouraging me and giving me tips with his little knowledge of the sport. “That looked good, do that again!”  (having a health coach or person who can encourage you and help you along your journey is a must)

4.  Starting the tradition of annual backpacking trips, completing sections on the Colorado Trail each summer!  (getting outdoors, getting physical and out of your comfort zone is a great way to change up your daily routine)

3.  Taking me on mountain bike rides, without any mental prep of the challenging terrain I was about to encounter.  (trying new things and being open to new experiences and new opportunities is key to life and certainly has applications to a healthy lifestyle)

2.  For his diligence and dedication to walking.  He keeps a pedometer and hits 100,000 steps each week!  (setting achievable yet challenging goals will help keep you engaged in exercise and in life)

1.  He accepts when I challenge him to a running race…even when he knows I’m gonna beat him ;)  (spice it up with a little competition)

As I reminisce on the many memories and on-going adventures that are inspired by my Dad, I am so very thankful.  With fitness in mind, doing this exercise made me realize that movement, the great outdoors and a sense of exploration has been instilled in me from a young age.  Looking over this list, I love the theme of movement without structure.  He loves these activities and wanted to enjoy them with his kids because it was playing, sparking curiosity, connection and laughter.

Now, I still search for the bigger feelings beyond getting sweaty.  This comes in all forms from the rush of a bike ride, working out in a group setting or with a friend where I can connect and have the accountability of someone else there with me, playing with a new piece of equipment, learning a new exercise, or preparing for an upcoming race or competition.

I challenge you to think of someone who inspires you to get active.  Take five minutes to make a list and feel the motivation as you physically write down the ways you are grateful and enjoy moving your body!  A, this is brilliant as your mind can only hold one thought at a time, make it a positive one.  B, it will give you ideas of how you can inspire others to get active as well!  Just this morning a best friend and I wanted to meet for coffee…we put a physical twist on it, we chose to walk at the park with our warm beverages and chatter.

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I offer my thanks to all those fathers and men who have given their time and devotion to help bring this gift of movement to life.  Personal thanks to my daddy for your living example of health and active play.  I so look forward to our upcoming backpacking trip!

Lizzie :)


Vulnerability is all we need!

How many of us think of vulnerability and weakness synonymously?

We often times think of someone who is vulnerable as meek and timid, attempting something that may completely crush them emotionally, making them seem weak.

I will be so bold to say, that I believe that vulnerability is not weakness!

To describe it further, vulnerability is emotional risk, exposure, uncertainty, and it fuels our daily lives.  Vulnerability is our most accurate measure of courage.  To be seen, to be honest, to take a risk is courageous. It is vulnerability that allows us to face our greatest fears, to ask ourselves to be better. When we are vulnerable we are willing to fail, we are willing to make mistakes, and we are willing to accept who we are.

But in order to be vulnerable we have to talk about shame. Shame is the evil enemy, that can thwart us in our quest to stay vulnerable.  Shame is a belief that “I am bad.”  Shame gets in the way of meeting our highest level of self-efficacy.  It is self-efficacy and self-acceptance that is needed to remain vulnerable and continue to face fears without being afraid to fail.

Why do I bring this up?  Simple… what I do for a living is labeled by most as a ‘personal trainer.’  What I like to call myself is a ‘behavioral change specialist’.  I believe that my career is based around me helping others create new behaviors that allow them to succeed and face their greatest fears.  Unfortunately that equation requires me to encourage someone to face their fears and be completely vulnerable.

Vulnerability is that powerful because it is the birthplace of innovation, creativity, and change.  To create is to make something that has never existed before.  To change is to adapt, and adaptation requires failure.  Failure is sometimes one of the biggest fears we must overcome when seeking a fitness goal.

So, what I will leave you to ponder is: Are you willing to be vulnerable?  Because vulnerability will take you more places, and allow you to accomplish more things for yourself, than pride and resources ever will.

Move More!
Hayley Hollander

One of my Favorite Videos and Shame Researcher, Brene Brown, uncovers what vulnerability and shame is all about in this TED Talk.

 


Begin with “Why?”

In my latest search of something good to read, I decided to take up a book recommendation by a colleague.  The book is, “Start With Why” by Simon Sinek.  Profound in its title, and inspiring in its message, I thought I would share some it’s great little nuggets with you all.

“There are leaders and there are those who lead.  Leaders hold a position of power or influence.  Those who lead inspire us.”

You may think of someone in your life who you believe is a true leader, and you also may distinguish them with a certain set of characteristics.  These characteristics are very unique, and most of the time stand a part from anyone else you may know. If we dive a little deeper, we could say that they are great leaders simply because they inspire people to act.

Think about that for a minute… when someone ACTS, they have to overcome a whole lot of obstacles to accomplish what it is they are inspired to do.  But in that true moment of inspiration, where we are eager to face anything that comes our way, no matter how challenging it is; more often than not it is because our sense of purpose or belonging or similar beliefs are matched with what is inspiring.  “For those who are inspired, the motivation to act is deeply personal.”

Here we meet a true leader’s bottom line… they start with the WHY!

When we start with the why of what or how we would do anything, we have a purpose.  When we have a purpose it is deeply rooted and individual.  An underlying recipe for a great leader is one who knows how to recognize their why.  The next step to leadership is matching your actions and words with your WHY.  And for those who seek to be inspired by true leaders, they are not drawn by the gold medals, or large bank accounts, or a powerful position; instead they are inspired by the fact that someone overcame obstacles with the same set of beliefs as their own.

In those rare moments in life when we are inspired by someone, we act.  Sometimes we act to belong, or to share, or to overcome, or even to make a difference; but no matter what OUR actions that occur as a result of someone’s leadership, often times will lead others too.

So, I ask you, what is your WHY?  And how can we match our (ATP’s) WHY with you?  Because ultimately, when we share similar beliefs in one another we are inspired to act.  Whether it be to act through sharing time for movement, or maybe just to listen to others needs, or even create an opportunity to have fun while getting movement… WE want to lead you to a healthy lifestyle simply based on YOUR OWN WHY!

Move More,
Hayley Hollander

Take a look at Simon Sinek’s TED Talk on “Starting With Why.”


Want to get MELTed?

Want to get M.E.L.T.ed?

I know, I know you might be asking… What does M.E.L.T. mean?

I thought the same thing when I first heard about it two years ago.  I had the opportunity to take a M.E.L.T. class from the creator  Sue Hitzmann at IDEA World in 2010 and was blown away at how amazing and refreshed I felt afterwards.  M.E.L.T. stands for Myofascial Energetic Length Technique.  I know, I know… a lot of BIG words!

Let me explain what the BIG words mean.  Do you every wake up in the morning and have aches and pains?  Do you ever reach your arm up high in the air and feel the rest of your body talking to you, specifically from the rib cage down?  When you set your feet down on the floor in the morning after getting out of bed, do your feet ache? Or maybe you just have this nagging pain, that no amount of stretching can take care of?  What most likely is speaking to you is your connective tissue.

Your connective tissue is the glue that holds the whole body together.  It’s interwoven into all of the layers in our body.  It attaches our muscles to our bones, distributes forces, resists forces, and has nine times more nerve endings that our muscles.  Our connective tissue makes us into the shapes that we are, establishes our posture, and communicates between all the systems of the body.  OUR CONNECTIVE TISSUE IS AWESOME AND IT NEEDS OUR ATTENTION.

The M.E.L.T. Method is a way to self-treat and bring our connective tissue the attention it needs.  Through a series of specific techniques we can awaken our gunked up connective tissue, rehydrate it through certain movements and massage techniques, allowing us to redistribute fluid flow and keep our systems running at full speed.

This past weekend I had the opportunity to attend the M.E.L.T. Hand and Foot Instructor Training with the creator Sue Hitzmann, and I am excited to share this new way to rejuvenate the body and gear us up to participate more whole-heartedly in the movements we love without missing a beat.

If you would like to join me for the very first FREE M.E.L.T. Class it will be held on Friday April 20th, 2012 at 5:30pm.  The class is limited to 10 participants, and is on a first come first serve basis.  To reserve your spot, please contact me via phone/text 702-285-4549.  Allow me to show you how to use the M.E.L.T. method to make you feel better, move better, and decrease stress?

Move More!
Hayley

To see the M.E.L.T Method in action check out this video:


Inspired…. and more!

This week one of my clients told me something that brought tears to my eyes and made me feel the most accomplished I have ever felt in my short lived career.

It was something so simple, but made me realize my deepest desire in what I do for living had been met.

You see last year, I hit several remarkable milestones in my career…
– I became a published author for one of the most renowned online fitness resources, PtontheNet; not just once, but two times over.
– I presented at IDEA World fitness conference alongside some of the industry’s best on an international stage.
– I was promoted to Master Trainer for TRX and became responsible for developing future instructors in the industry.
– I had the honor of teaching 4 mentorships to a private career college to new trainers coming into the industry.

I recall feeling proud in each of those moments and recognizing their significance in my journey, but still they didn’t surmount to the moment that happened this week.

My client, who was home for spring break from college, told me she had a project in her class where she had to give a speech on someone who inspired her.  She said that it was one of the easiest speeches she ever had to give, and wanted to thank me for everything I had taught her.  She felt confident that she could be healthy and live her life in the best way possible because of how I had trained her.  She concluded by saying: “You inspire me.”

I was overwhelmed by the feelings that came after she told me.

I got into training, because someone INSPIRED me too!  Someone taught me what exercise and living a healthy lifestyle could do.  I got into training because I wanted to inspire others. It really all boils down to that. So when she said I inspired her, I FELT COMPLETE.

Inspiration by dictionary definition is: “A divine influence.”

I believe that to be inspired, we must not only be influenced to do something, but we must feel that in our pursuit those that grace our path in hopes of helping; listen to our needs physically, emotionally, and mentally.  Stimulating us in every aspect of our being, and showing us that we are capable of accomplishing whatever we set our mind, body, and soul to. Inspiration comes when someone believes in us more than we believe in ourselves.  The moment when that belief from someone becomes a reality in proof of what our own actions accomplish is when we are inspired.

Many of you have entrusted me in helping you in your pursuit of health and fitness.  I do not take it lightly that you have given me that responsibility. I only hope that in your journey towards reaching your goals you can be inspired too.

Inspiration requires two things… An obstacle to overcome, and a belief that we can overcome it.

So my challenge to any trainer in the industry is to supply a belief in your clients. And my challenge to any client seeking health and fitness goals is to find someone who believes in your ability to reach those goals. But most importantly, trainers should ask this KEY question when interviewing clients: “In what ways to you believe I can help you?”

“When we find the why, we find the way.” (Paul Taylor) And when we are on the way, it is the ‘belief’ that we can that allows us to figure out the HOW.

Move More,
Hayley Hollander
(For more info on building inspiration from the first encounter with a client visit http://www.ptaglobal.com and look into the Program Design Questionairre)


Foot Fetish Part 3

Topic: Myths about barefoot running

Intended audience: Runners

Essay Map: Educating yourself about the facts of running barefoot (if that’s your goal), will allow you to safely transition from thicker soled running shoes.

I’m back with part 3 of Foot Fetish. In the second post, we went over two reasons why barefoot running could be detrimental to people who are overweight, or have bad knees. In part 3 we will look at orthotics and plantar fasciitis.

Once again, you’ll be reading direct quotes from Nicholas A. Campitelli, DPM, FACFAS. I will place my views, and opinions in underlined italics with my initials AH.

“Barefoot running, minimalist running and natural running are all terms that describe running in a manner that allows our foot to function the way it was designed (or has evolved). This happens through the use of little or no shoe at all. Many runners suffering from chronic injuries are adopting this way of running and are experiencing relief of symptoms to find themselves running with enjoyment and a more relaxing form.”

The key word is many not all. AH

I too have been cured of a running injury, which I suffered from for over eight years after transitioning my gait to that of a “barefoot” runner. Without further ado, here are the 10 myths of barefoot running.”

 

Cured is a provocative word to use, as it might lead readers to assume barefoot running will cure them as it did the author. As a DPM I’ll guess that he might have started some sort of regimen to help in his ”curing” i.e. flexibility, mobility, and/or strengthening exercises He also could have added a warm up ”movement prep” and “cool down” to his routine. AH

 

How Do Orthotics And Plantar Fasciitis Come Into Play With Barefoot Running?

I can’t do barefoot running because I need to wear my orthotics. Orthotics has become more over-utilized in the practice of podiatry then ever before. It is very common for me to see runners present in my office with plantar fasciitis, a normal arch, cushioned running shoes and orthotics they have worn. When running barefoot or in a minimalist shoe, we do not need to control motion at the rear-foot because heel striking is not occurring and “excessive pronation,” as described by Root, does not occur. While we have numerous studies that do not support the use of orthotics for running injuries alone, it becomes a challenge to convince the patient they are not needed.

I have plantar fasciitis so barefoot running would be too painful. This article was not intended to discuss the pathomechanics or treatment options of plantar fasciitis. However, we are anecdotally seeing resolution of symptoms in those who adopt this style of running. One potential explanation is the development in strength we see to the intrinsic musculature, specifically the abductor hallucis muscle, which is a primary supporter of the arch.

Another overlooked phenomenon is the fact that the majority of running shoes place your ankle into plantar-flexion. This forces the body to compensate by increasing lumbar lordosis and increasing pressure to the heel as opposed to having more even distribution throughout the foot.

As a Fitness Professional, I am faced with these two obstacles all the time. What can I do? Well, I can’t diagnose, as that’s not in a Fitness Professionals scope of practice. I will not challenge or criticize the clients Dr. or who ever prescribed the orthotics. If the client chose their treatment on their own I would not criticize them either. All that would do if create a wall and devalue us as professions, not to mention coming off appearing like a know it all, and we all know those are the ones that really don’t know anything at all.

I would instead offer other options, modalities of exercise if you will, self-myofascial release with a tennis ball (soft) and slowly progress to a baseball (medium), then a golf ball (hard). Vibration training i.e. Power Plate would be a good way to “melt” the connective tissues beneath our feet (hydrating), while at the same time, triggering muscle contractions in the foot, which would strengthen the foot. This would improve our natural arch support and likely reduce plantar fasciitis. If you work with the client as a “guide on the side” versus ordering your clients “sage on the stage” you’ll empower them, which will make them more open to various methods of exercises, some of which might be the “one’ that finally helps your client overcome their discomfort. AH

 

 


Short and Sweet… and To The Point!

For many of our fans who have attended our boot camp classes, you’ve experienced a type of work out that involves short periods of intense exercise followed by light exercise or rest.  You may think its just the way we run the class, but actually there is a method to the madness.

You see we are programming intervals, and what Arthur and I are so diligently watching on the heart rate screen is that you are all working anaerobically and then recovering to an aerobic zone.  In the world of personal training, we call it interval training.

Interval training provides the body with intense bouts of exercise followed by light bouts of activity to allow the body to recover.  During the intense bouts of exercise, the body is in need of delivering oxygen to the working muscle more quickly as the demand placed on the body becomes greater and greater through the duration of the exercise.  You will see your breathing rate increase as the working muscles are seeking more oxygen, and then of course your heart rate will increase too to deliver that oxygenated blood to the working muscles.  During interval training, as the exercise intensity increases there is a point when the body can no longer deliver oxygen to the working muscles quick enough; so our body instead uses our Anaerobic (without oxygen) energy system.  Think of your Anaerobic energy system as the stuff already stored in the tissues for fuel (its like a stop and the ‘convenient store, instead of the grocery store- simply quicker energy).

When we train anaerobically our heart rate is increased, our breathing is labored, and its difficult for anyone to sustain intense exercise for very long.  So, if it feels intense and it’s hard to sustain, why even bother training this way?  Well, there are MULTIPLE benefits to training this way.

1- Your body burns up to 5 calories for every liter of oxygen consumed
*When we increase our heart rate by doing more intense exercise, we increase our oxygen intake, and therefore increase our caloric burn.
2- What goes up must come down!
*When we increase our heart rate and oxygen consumption during intense exercise, our body will seek to go back to it’s homeostatic state.  We burn many calories to get back to our resting state, through replenishing cellular supplies with much needed nutrients, and using up nutrients to repair the worked tissue.
3- Increased aerobic capacity
*When training in the various heart rate gears and you go up and down frequently, it allows us to increase the strength of the heart as a muscle, as well as improve cardiac output during and after exercise.  One long term benefit will be an increased anaerobic threshold, or the ability of the body to utilize fat and oxygen for fuel without turning anaerobic too quickly; allowing us to sustain exercise for longer before feeling fatigued.
4- Increased Lean Muscle Mass
*By doing interval training we are stressing the tissues at the cellular level, promoting growth and regeneration both hormonally and structurally.

Bottom Line… We burn more calories, we train the ENTIRE body (cellular and structural), and we build a healthy cardio-respiratory system equipped to meet the stressful demands of everyday life.

So, before you think you need to go out and do a long sustained workout at a steady state intensity; ask yourself if you want more bang for your buck and keep it short and sweet and to the point, loaded with high intensity intervals!

Move More!
Hayley Hollander

Reference: http://www.greatist.com/fitness/interval-training-complete-guide/

 


Foot Fetish part 2

Topic: Myths about barefoot running

Intended audience: Runners

Essay Map: Educating yourself about the facts of running barefoot (if that’s your goal), will allow you to safely transition from thicker soled running shoes.

I’m back with part 2 of Foot Fetish. In the first post, we went over the a few perceptions on barefoot running like how it leads to stress fractures, and how if you have flat feet, you’ll need support. In part 2 we will look at weight, and knee issues.

Once again, you’ll be reading direct quotes from Nicholas A. Campitelli, DPM, FACFAS. I will place my views, and opinions in underlined italics with my initials AH.

“Barefoot running, minimalist running and natural running are all terms that describe running in a manner that allows our foot to function the way it was designed (or has evolved). This happens through the use of little or no shoe at all. Many runners suffering from chronic injuries are adopting this way of running and are experiencing relief of symptoms to find themselves running with enjoyment and a more relaxing form.”

The key word is many not all. AH

I too have been cured of a running injury, which I suffered from for over eight years after transitioning my gait to that of a “barefoot” runner. Without further ado, here are the 10 myths of barefoot running.”

 

Cured is a provocative word to use, as it might lead readers to assume barefoot running will cure them as it did the author. As a DPM I’ll guess that he might have started some sort of regimen to help in his ”curing” i.e. flexibility, mobility, and/or strengthening exercises He also could have added a warm up ”movement prep” and “cool down” to his routine. AH

 

I weigh too much. While this is a common excuse to not run, being overweight is not reason enough not to run barefoot or in a minimalist shoe. In 2010, Leiberman and co-workers were able to demonstrate that habitually unshod runners were able to generate smaller collision forces than shod heel strikers.6 In other words, by forefoot striking, we decrease the force that transmits through the lower extremity, thereby reducing torque forces to the ankle, knee and hip joints.7 Clearly, we can see that if people weigh 250 lbs., they would be placing more force through their joints by heel striking then by landing on their forefoot”.

I agree that you can decrease the force transmitted through the body by changing your strike, however I believe the writer is overlooking a critical component. If someone is overweight, odds are they have not been exercising regularly, could be sedentary, but most importantly not conditioned to start a running program. When I say unconditioned, that could mean that the individual might not have the cardiovascular endurance of more importantly the muscles, and connective tissues of the body lack the strength and endurance to handle any type of force transmitted through the body. AH.

Would Bad Knees Inhibit Barefoot Running?

“I have bad knees. Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common concern among many runners, especially older individuals who have run the majority of their lives. There are many theories as to why running is bad or even good for your knees. So many in fact that elliptical machines were invented to be used as a form of exercise similar to running without causing excess pressure to the joints.8 However, these elliptical machines do not reproduce anatomical motions and an in vivo force analysis reveals there is less force with walking than with an elliptical trainer”.9-11

You can’t out run time, age will eventual catch us all, and osteoarthritis is an age related condition. I have not read the study on elliptical machines versus walking, however from personal experience, both are less stressful to my body than running and the elliptical machine can get me to train all my cardio zones better than walking. What I would suggest though is that you may want to talk with your doctor in regards to supplementation like joint support. As a personal trainer what I would recommend if you haven’t yet, is to start a mobility/flexibility and strength program. I would emphasize the ankles and hips, because allowing full ROM in those respective areas could take some of the workload (force transmission) away from the knee, and transmit it throughout the rest of the body like we are designed to do. AH.

 

“As I noted previously, we know that ground reactive forces are greater with heel strike in comparison to unshod or barefoot runners who adapt a more forefoot strike pattern.6 Numerous studies have demonstrated higher ground reactive forces and mechanical stresses to the knee while running in traditional running shoes as opposed to barefoot.12-13 A recent study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine looked at patients with knee osteoarthritis over 12 months and found no difference between wearing a lateral wedge orthotic versus a control flat insert.14 Similarly, a systematic review of literature demonstrates that external knee adduction moment and pain associated with knee osteoarthritis is higher in individuals wearing sneakers in comparison to those who do barefoot walking”.15

 

When I complete the 10 Myths of barefoot Running, I will post all of Nicholas’s bibliography for referencing.

 

Reference:

Campitelli A. Nicholas (2012 January) Tackling the 10 Myths of Barefoot Running. Podiatry Today Volume 25 Issue1.


Moments of Movement

I recently was intrigued by an article I read on PtontheNet written by Mr. John Berardi, a leading nutritionist, author, and presenter in the fitness industry.

He relayed his feeling of frustration about the constant inundation the media portrays of ‘quick fix’ diets and workout plans.  I mean, can we really get in shape in just 10 minutes a day?  Berardi, despite his angst, decided to take a whole new look at these quick fixes, and while applying fundamental principles made the complex simple for one client.

By instilling small, attainable goals for his ‘tester’ client he was able to help her achieve a larger goal of ‘maintained weight loss.’  His simple program looked like this:

Monday – 6 minutes of sprint intervals on the treadmill
Tuesday – 10 minutes of bodyweight circuit training
Thursday – 6 minutes of sprint intervals on the treadmill
Friday – 10 minutes of bodyweight circuit training
[That’s right, only 32 minutes of exercise per week.]
Her dietary strategies were equally simple:
Weeks 1 and 2
– eat normally, however eat each meal slowly and eat about 4 total meals each day
Weeks 3 and 4 – with each meal, eat protein, legumes, and veggies (while avoiding white carbs)
Weeks 5 and 6 – one day per week, eat whatever you want
Weeks 7 and 8 – if still included, skip fruit and calorie-containing drinks

Simple right?  That’s what I thought!

Which made me wonder if I have been overwhelming my own clients with too many to do’s in their workout programs. If not, then I say to you “maintain the course.”  If yes, then I apologize, and may I encourage you to instead look for “Moments of Movement.”

Let’s keep it simple.  Look for moments during your day to move. Move in your own way, and for as long as you have time to in each moment you choose.  Break up your moments, and allow the body to do what it likes to do.  These moments, collectively by the end of every week can help you get to your goal. 

For example, my client Mary spoke of one of her memorable moments of movement.  On a long car ride, across several states, and accompanied by two aunts who loved to move, found themselves playing “Auto Aerobics.”  This moment of movement was a game in which all the passengers in the car took turns coming up with an exercise/movement they could do with their arms.  After much laughter, many silly movements, and almost an hour of passed time, they found a moment of movement that they will never forget.

As with Mary’s example, let’s keep the complex simple, and just move!  And to all of my clients… I want you to worry about having fun and moving when, where, and how much you want… I’ll take care of the rest when I see you.

Until then… MOVE MORE!
Hayley Hollander

To see John Berardi’s article in full click the link:
Exploring Fitness Minimalism


Foot Fetish

Topic: Myths about barefoot running.

Intended audience: Runners,

Thesis: To help runners sort through the facts and fictions of barefoot running.

Essay Map: With the proper education you can enjoy barefoot running (if that is your choice). This article will help better prepare you for the road ahead.

I stumbled across an article on Facebook, posted by Rodney Corn from Podiatry Today. The article was called “tackling the 10 myths of barefoot running”. Written by Nicholas A. Campitelli DPM, FACFAS. In the upcoming blogs, I will post sections of the article so we can digest this information a little bit at a time. This will give us time to fully digest some of the concerns that can come about from barefoot running.  I will have some input of my own which will be underlined with my initials AH.

 

“Barefoot running, minimalist running and natural running are all terms that describe running in a manner that allows our foot to function the way it was designed (or has evolved). This happens through the use of little or no shoe at all. Many runners suffering from chronic injuries are adopting this way of running and are experiencing relief of symptoms to find themselves running with enjoyment and a more relaxing form.”

The key word is many not all. AH

I too have been cured of a running injury, which I suffered from for over eight years after transitioning my gait to that of a “barefoot” runner. Without further ado, here are the 10 myths of barefoot running.”

 

Cured is a provocative word to use, as it might lead readers to assume barefoot running will cure them as it did the author. As a DPM I’ll guess that he might have started some sort of regimen to help in his ”curing” i.e. flexibility, mobility, and/or strengthening exercises He also could have added a warm up ”movement prep” and “cool down” to his routine. AH

 

Barefoot running leads to stress fractures. Without a doubt, the most common concern with barefoot or minimalist running is the development of a stress fracture. While there have been documented cases of this in the literature, stress fractures occur as a result of a change in activity without gradual adaptation and are not directly related to the shoe gear or lack thereof.1 We actually should see a decrease in the likelihood of stress fracture given the change in stride and cadence that one acquires while running barefoot.

  I bold faced this sentence, because I felt was an important statement. AH

Stress fractures occur secondary to overuse without the body having adapted adequately as proven by Wolff’s Law.3 In fact, if we adhere to Wolff’s law in theory, we should see weaker bone trabecular patterns on those wearing cushioned running shoes due to decreased intrinsic muscle strength, resulting in a proportional decrease in the force acting on the respective bone.”

Trabecular patterns: an irregular meshwork of stress and stress-related struts within a cancellous bone.

I have flat feet and I need support. Lees and Klemerman have demonstrated that there is no correlation between foot type and running injuries, specifically with a pes planus deformity.5 During barefoot running, we avoid heel striking and land more on our forefoot or midfoot. Once the forefoot strikes the ground, pronation of the entire foot begins (not isolated pronation of the subtalar joint) and continues until the point where the heel touches the ground. Arch height becomes irrelevant, as does the commonly described concept of pronation with the heel striking the ground first. With a forefoot/midfoot strike, pronation is very beneficial and helps to absorb shock.”

On top of that studies shows and research articles state that flexibility, mobility, and strength exercises can reverse flat feet as one of the causes associated with flat feet is weakened muscles and other connective tissues. AH

Reference:

Campitelli A. Nicholas (2012 January) Tackling the 10 Myths of Barefoot Running. Podiatry Today Volume 25 Issue 1.


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